Descendants of Joannis (Heb) HAPP

Notes


4. Maria (Hepp) HAPP

Notes for Maria HEEP 1794-1830:

    From the records that the writer researched it would appear Peter Clasen (Classen or Klasen) and Maria HEEP,Hepp,HAP or HAPP had three children.  The first two, although not born on the same date, evidently  were twins.  Maria died at 36 years of age although the death certificate does show 38 years of age. Maria married Joanis Petrus Clasen, iron-worker, on 26 January, 1820.  After Maria died Peter Clasen married Maria’s  younger sister Susanna.
     None of Peter and Maria’s children lived to be teen age. They died at very young ages as did so many others during the first half of this century. Mortality rates were extremely high. Sanitary conditions especially at the time of childbirth caused the life of many mothers. Various diseases  ravaged the populace of  Europe during this time..  It was not until later in this century  that mortality rates began falling. The improvement in general sanitary conditions and the advancements in medicine aided in this decline. It is writen just the washing of the hands for those attending a birth saved many, many lives of both mother and infant.

                                                     Josef Clasen                 1821 - 1824
                                                     Susanna Clasen            1821 - 1828
                                                     Anna Helena  Clasen    1825 - 1833
                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                        G.E. Happ


Johann Peter CLASEN (KLASEN)

Notes for Johann Peter CLASEN 1788-1869:

     Peter Clasen (Classen or Klasen), was an Eisenschmid (iron-worker) and the son of Johann and Anna (Otten) Clasen. They were both from Röth by Prum, Germany. One year after Maria Happ's death Peter Clasen married Susanna Heep, Maria's younger sister.
     After Susanna's death Peter married Anna Barbara Meyer. Peter and Barbara were married on May 6, 1837. Anna Barbara Meyer was born January 1, 1806 in Stadtkyll and she was the daughter of Carl and Catherine (Shimbs) Meyer. (Mr. Peter Klaren, Village Historian, Müllenborn, Germany.) Peter and Barbara had several children. Their daughter and eldest child, Anna Katherina Clasen, was born and baptized August 19, 1849 in Roth. Godparents were John Meyer, single, of Roth and Anna Katherina (Hoffmann) Hap of Stadtkyll, wife of Heinrich Haepp.
     "Roth by Prüm" There are two Roths in Germany. One is between the cities of Nurnberg and Munich.  Roth (sometimes Röth) by Prűm is about a mile north of Műllenborn and is the home of St. Anthony's Catholic Parish. Many of the records referred to here are from this Parish. There is also a small chapel-church, St. Anthony of Padua built in the 1600s, in the center of Műllenborn. The chapel is open for prayer and the bells are still rung everyday at noon. Herr Josef Wirp and wife Gertrud were responsible for this ringing when it was rung manually.  My wife Mrs. Happ had the privilege of ringing these bells one noon  on the occasion of our visit to Germany in Nov of 1993.

                                                                                                              G.E. Happ


12. Anna Helina CLASEN

Notes for Josef, Susanna and Anna Helina CLASEN:
    Although Josef’s and Susanna’s dates of birth are not the same they were obviously twins. They were the first twins that we know of in the family. There were more twins occurring in the family in more recent years. From the records that the writer researched it would appear that no children from the marriage of Peter Clasen and Maria HAP  lived to be teen age. We do not have a record of the circumstances or causes of these premature deaths in the family. It had to be tragic no matter how common it might have been. This time in history was only the dawning of modern medicine as we know it. medical aid and counsel was hardly ever readily available if available at all.

G. E. Happ


5. John HAPP

Notes for John HAPP 1795-1863:

     John Happ or HÄPP as he signed his name in Germany was a Blacksmith  His Father in Müllenborn and  his Grandfather were  iron-workers..   He was born in Müllenborn, Germany on October 13, 1795. Some sources will have his birth as 1794 however looking at the original entries in the church book of  St. Antonious Church in Roth, Germany  the birth is recorded October 13, 1795. These same records reveal that he had a sister Maria who was born in March, 1794. We do not have a photo of Johann however we have a description of how he appeared in  1843 when he was 48 years old and applied for his Prussian Passport:  Height- 5’5”, Hair-Black, Forehead-Round, Eyebrow-Blk, Nose-Long, Mouth-Wide, Beard-Black/Grey, Chin-Round,  Face-Long,  Color-Healthy,  Figure-Stocky, Small scar over left eye.
     The village of Müllenborn is located in the Eifel area of western Germany approximately 40 miles north of Trier.  The village was incorporated into the nearby larger village of Gerolstein in 1972. The area borders Luxemburg and France, very picturesque with it’s rolling hills and stands of  beautiful tall pines. The “Schmetten/Happ House”  in Müllenborn still stands today (2008.)
     On the 19th day of August 1819 he married a GERTRUD (BLUM)  from Gönnersdorf, Germany. (I use Germany although actually Germany did not exist as a nation at this time. It  was shortly after Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo and by treaty this area was awarded to Prussia.) In Gönnersdorf, living in the “House of Schmitz- Blum” he turned to farming. While living in Gönnersdorf the couple had eleven children. Heinrich their first child died as an infant. They later named another one of their children Heinrich. In 1843 at the age of forty-eight and with ten living children, the youngest  being less than three years of age, they immigrated to America accompanied by Herr Heinrich Blum, Gertrud’s father.
     After weeks and weeks of travel  their ship, the Lucilla, arrived in New York harbor. The recorded date of the arrival is August 13, 1843. Unfortunately we do not have any record of their movement after this date until we see the family appearing on the 1850 census living in Wynetka [Winnetka.] We can only guess as to their mode of travel from New York to Illinois. Many of the overland routes went to Detroit and then to their various destinations from there. By 1843 the Erie Canal was open (1825) and there was a  water route from New York to Chicago. “By 1836 the water journey between the two places [New York and Chicago] took seventeen and one-half days in optimal conditions.”  (Taylor, Philip A. M. , The Distant Magnet)
     It was after the Black Hawk War the word spread. The government was selling some of the fertile lands of the Midwest, large sections of the states of Michigan, Wisconsin and Illinois. It is at this time, the 30s and 40s  that we see the first surge of German immigrants from the Alsace-Trier area of Europe, mostly farmers. In addition to these immigrants from Europe there came a wave of “Yankees” from the New England States who were moving West. This was a mass movement of settlers. “By actual count 250 wagons passed through a Michigan Village in  one day.” “In 1836 the line of wagons was almost continuous.”   (Herman & Rick Kogan, Yesterday’s Chicago)
     When we think of Winnetka and the larger metropolitan area of Chicago today it is difficult to imagine a time without paved roads and brick buildings. However until 1833 “the land along the north shore was occupied mostly by Indians.” “on the Green Bay Road a traveler in 1837 only saw two houses between Chicago and the Winnetka Hill.“ Initially Chicago was not a destination  for this wave of immigrants. Chicago remained almost land-locked and without any port facilities for years because of shallow waters and an extensive sand and gravel bar that shut off access to the now Chicago river. This situation plus the lack of a treaty with the Indians held up the development of the area for years. Even as late as 1840 Chicago was only 92 on the U. S. Bureau of Census “Population of the 100 Urban Places in 1840.” Chicago was well behind in growth compared to many other Midwest cities. Chicago in 1833, when it was first incorporated, had a population maybe of 100 settlers.  However visionaries among the very earliest trappers and missionaries could see the potential of a port city at the foot of Lake Michigan with a waterway to the Illinois River. In 1833 the Sauk Indian leader Black Hawk  gave up his quest to regain the area on which his people had hunted and lived for years.  A firm treaty was achieved in 1833 and the city was incorporated. About 1834 the river was dredged and the mouth of the river was opened up to shipping. Chicago was now a port city. Commerce boomed and the population exploded. By 1867 Chicago became the largest center for lumber distribution in the world and likewise with grain handling, 60 million bushels in1870. “As many as 300 vessels arrived in Chicago in a single twelve hour period.”  (Mayer & WadeChicago, Growth of a Metropolis )
      As Chicago grew so did most of the communities along the North Shore. The city provided a ready market for the hay and grain grown by the  farmers nearby. When the Happ family arrived in Wynetka (Winnetka), Illinois we see Mr. Happ had purchased 80.83 acres of land on the shores of Lake Michigan. Mr. Alexander McDaniel had purchased this property from the government in 1841. (70 acres NW¼ of NW¼ & NE¼ of NW ¼  and 10 83/100 acres S and adj to NE¼ of NW¼ Sect 21, Twp 42N, 13E,  3M, New Trier Twp. ASSESSMENT RECORDS 1850, Evanston Historical Society, Rosemary Schmitt.) This property extended from about Ridge Avenue to the shores of Lake Michigan. The property would probably include what is known today as  the Village Green. The property being on the Lake was subject to erosion  and not  quit as ideal for farming as it was for his blacksmith shop. Of the location  Laura Townsend Dickenson, in her History of Winnetka  writes:

             John Happ, in 1843, chose a strategic site. His Smithy was located 'in a grove of flowering locust trees at the southwest corner of the present Maple (then Green Bay Road) and Elm streets. John Happ and his family came to stay, their intention evidenced by his log house, shop, and the surrounding log buildings-sheds for wagons, vegetable storage, implements-all part of the Happ settlement. In a real and lasting sense the Happ family were the first permanent settlers in the region. Here he established himself as the area blacksmith. Servicing the smithy needs of the settlers in the area and those of the stagecoaches and horses of the travelers that used the 'Green Bay' Trail.

     In the early 1850's John Happ had a setback.  We see the beginnings of the railroad along the north shore and this  lessened the need for blacksmiths along the trail. It was probably in 1850 when John Happ sold his property in Winnetka. The property tax rolls for New Trier Township for that year show his owning 120 acres  just west  of his original property. This property is at Happ and Winnetka roads and is where the family and several generations of their descendents lived.  (SW¼ of SW¼, SE¼ of SW¼  and  NE ¼ of SE¼, Sect 19)
     John Happ was a well known and respected  citizen. He is credited with naming the township of New Trier. He helped organize the building of the first wooden church at St. Joseph in Wilmette. In 1849 he was elected the first Justice of the Peace for that area of Cook County and Happ Road was named in his honor. John Happ passed away in 1863 several years before his wife Gertrude. His daughter and three of his sons married, had families and remained mostly  in the area.  Three other sons went to California, married and had families. Three others moved to Chicago.
     Over the years there have been articles written that report Johann Happ to have purchased original Govrernment Land Grants of 200 and 300 acres with it extending to Tower Road. The writer has not found any records to support these statements. It is not likely because at the time the property up to Tower Road was owned by several others, the Garlands, Taylors, Gage and even his son-in-law, Peter Peterman, had 40 acres north of the Happ property and south of Tower Road.  However when Mr. Happ moved from his first homestead he did purchase 120 acres in sec 19 so there was a time in early 1850’s when he owned both properties and it could be said he owned 200 acres (80.83+120).

                                                                                                          Gerard  E. Happ


Gertrud BLUM

Notes for Gertrud BLUM 1800-1878:

     Anna Gertrud was born  on April 13 , 1800 in the village of Gönnersdorf, Germany in the House of Schmitz. This is the time when last names were just finding their way into usage. The name of the house was very often derived from the family name of the original owner (Gertrud’s Grandmother, Gertrud Schmitz.) and that name became the last name of those born there. When Gertrud’s mother married Johann Blum it became known as the “Schmitz-Blum” house. You can understand the confusion as time went on. This house does not stand today (1997.) It was taken down by a developer in 1967.
     It has been family belief that Gertrud was an only child. ex., Sister Maria de la Salette: "Grandma was an only child" Sister Maria is the daughter of Wilhelm Happ. (Letter to John B. Happ, 1940). [Perhaps the only living child?] The village history book, "Alt Gönnersdorf and It's Families" page 39, shows the Blum family as having five children. Two of the children died while very young. The two others, Johann, born 6 February 1899 and Marie Gertrud born 6 November 1807, are listed without dates of deaths. Further research could possibly show additional family members from these two children.
     On the 17th of February in 1817 and not yet seventeen years of age Anna Gertrud married Herr William Buch of Auel, Germany. Unfortunately William Buch died the next year. Gertrud then married Johann Happ on August19, 1819 in Hillsheim, Germany. They had eleven children. The first, Heinrich, died as an infant in Germany.
     Father of Gertrud, Heinrich Blum, was the son of Johann Blum of Obertingen, Germany. On February 3, 1762 he married Gertrud Schmitz from the House of Schmitz of Gönnersdorf, later House of Schmitz-Blum. He died shortly after arriving in America and is said to be buried in St. Peter's Cemetery, Gross Point (Skokie), Illinois (Sister Maria de la Salette letter to John B. Happ, 1940). Heinrich Blum had a brother Matthias Blum who lived in Gönnersdorf and married Anna Sons and had seven children. Mother of Gertrud, Gertrud Hoffman, was the daughter of Joseph Hoffman and Anna Marie Fink from the House of Broechen in Gönnersdorf  (“Alt Gönnersdorf ...”). She died on 18th of April 1818 in Gönnersdorf.
We have record of eleven children from the Johann HAPP / BLUM marriage:
                                                   Heinrich Happ  …………..  1820-1820
                                                   Maria Katherina HAPP ..... 1822-1898
                                                   Matthias HAPP ................... 1824-1858
                                                   Johann Peter HAPP .......... 1826-1849
                                                   Matthias Josef HAPP ........ 1828-1908
                                                   Heinrich HAPP ................... 1830-<1861>
                                                   Bertrand HAPP .................. 1832-1891
                                                   Wilhelm HAPP ................... 1833-1903
                                                   Johann Frederick HAPP ... 1835-1902
                                                  Johann Jacob HAPP ......... 1837-1890
                                                  Simon HAPP ...................... 1840-1907

                                                                                                                 Gerard E. Happ


13. Heinrich HAPP

Notes for Heinrich Happ:

   Heinrich was the first born of this family however like so many others at the time he died as an infant. No cause of death could be found.  Godparents were Heinrich Blum (Grandfather) of Gönnersdorf  and  Maria Katherina Heep (Grandmother) of Müllenborn.

                                                                                                                Gerard Happ


16. John Peter HAPP

Notes for Peter HAPP 1826-1849:

    John Peter or Peter is not shown as living with the family in the U.S. Census of 1850. We have record of a John Peter Happ as being buried in St. Joseph’s Cemetery on August 1, 1849 and also shown  clearly  on the 1850 “Illinois Mortality Schedule” (page 43); as 23,  male, single and dying on July 30, 1849, in Chicago of cholera, and sick ½ day. However, for a reason the writer cannot determine, there is a Peter Happ enumerated with the other Happ families; William, John the Father, Joseph and John a brother all on the 1860 U.S. census for Wynetka (Winnetka). Normally the information on the U.S. Census is reliable. However this entry is highly questionable. So error in entering or copying?  Very likely.
    Sister Marie de la Sallete writes in her letter of 1940 to John B. Happ: “Peter died very young after my father was married [1856].” It seems to the writer Sister may have had her Uncle John Peter mistaken for her Uncle Henry Happ who she says also died in Chicago.  Peter was born in 1826 and if he died after 1856 it would have made him at least thirty years old. This hardly seems very young.  Henry was born in 1830. If he died after 1856 he could have been as  young as twenty-six years old. It seems to the writer this could be considered very young.  There is a Henry Happ shown in Chicago Directories after 1856.
    From this evidence the writer would say  John Peter died in 1849 and was the first of the Happ boys who fell victim to one of the cholera or small pox epidemics that occurred in Chicago at this time in it’s history. Chicago was still a very young community; incorporated in 1833, population 350. In 1849 it was mostly swamp land, a scattering of little wooden shacks with very little, if any, thought given to matters of sanitation; disease ridden, one epidemic after another. "Water, garbage, and animal dung also accumulated under the plank streets."... "In 1854 cholera hit the expanding city with devastating force, taking nearly six percent of it's population. It was the sixth year in succession that Chicago had been visited by epidemics, including typhoid fever and dysentery.".... "What made cholera doubly frightening was the way it struck and killed. ... People who were well at noon were in the grave by night" (Donald L. Miller, City of the Century).

                                                                                                            Gerard Happ


18. Heinrich HAPP

Notes for Henry HAPP 1830<1859>:

    Henry is on the 1850 census with the family but he is not listed on the local census for 1860 with the other Happs. Some records would indicate that in the mid-1850s he left home and went to Chicago. Sister de la Salette wrote in her letter of 1942 to John B. Happ (1903-1990) "Henry who died in Chicago". To the writers knowledge the family does not have any other information on Henry with the exception of a few references like above as  to his dying in Chicago and not leaving any children. There are listings of a Henry HAPP  in some early Chicago city directories; 1858 as a Teamster, 1859 with a Saloon on South Church between Linden and Wisconsin, 1861 Saloon on South Church between Menomonee and Linden.
    Another son dying, Chicago was not good to the Happ family. This is the third death in Chicago, Peter, Matthias, Henry, and the fourth, William, was burned out.  The 50s were boom times but  with it came not so good times for many. Not only was there the cholera and typhoid epidemics but there were other issues. The Tribune  reports at this time, “We are beset on every side by gangs of desperate villains,”  Brothels, gambling dens, and grog shops lined every street in the business district. Robberies and murders became commonplace. (…. Yesterday’s Chicago)
     No record was ever  found  that would  indicate  either Henry or brother Peter ever married. 1860 census for New Trier Township does have a  Peter enumerated with the Happs  but it is believed this is an error. There is nothing in the records supporting his name being on the census appearing with a wife.

                                                                                                                    G.E. Happ


7. Susanna (Heep) HAPP

Notes for Susanna HEEP <1803>1837:

     Susanna died when she was about thirty-four years old. According to her Sterbeurkunde or death certificate she was 34 years of age the time of her death in January of 1837. Three months a widower, Peter Clasen married Anna Barbara Meyer in May of 1837  (Mr. Peter Klaren, Village Historian, Müllenborn).
     Matthias Happ, Susanna's father, died in 1835. Records would indicate Susanna was the only Happ in residence at the "Schmetten House" at that time. So it is probable when Susanna died the ownership of the Schmetten House passed into the hands of her husband Peter Clasen. Matthias Klasen, Susanna’s son, marries Magdelina Pink on 24 September, 1881 and they have two children, Elizabeth, September 17, 1883 and Marie Katherine, 18 March, 1885.
     Available land records for Müllenborn (held in Gerolstein) for the Schmetten house only go back to1895. At that time Josef, Nicholas, and Anna Katherina Klasen are shown as owners. These were three younger children of the Peter Clasen and Anna Barbara MEYER family. Then Nicholas is the sole owner until 1938. At that time the property is in the name of Elizabeth and Katherina Stoll. They are the children  of Gertrud Clasen, another child of the Clasen/Meyer marriage who married a Peter Stoll on 10 May, 1873.. In 1944 Kraemer, in 1988 Siemroth, then the last owner we have  is  Vladimir Kucaev, Gerolstein,1995. In a 1930 the Schmetten house is a ”Guesthaus.” Bed and Breakfast?  On a  photo taken that year and held by the writer we see "KLASSEN GUESTHAUS" painted on the side of the house.

Notes for husband  Peter CLASEN:
    See Maria HAPP

We have records for two children from the Susanna HAPP/ Peter CLASEN marriage:

                                                     Matthias CLASEN ........1832- …..
                                                     Josef CLASEN ........... 1834-1834)


Johann Peter CLASEN (KLASEN)

Notes for Johann Peter CLASEN 1788-1869:

     Peter Clasen (Classen or Klasen), was an Eisenschmid (iron-worker) and the son of Johann and Anna (Otten) Clasen. They were both from Röth by Prum, Germany. One year after Maria Happ's death Peter Clasen married Susanna Heep, Maria's younger sister.
     After Susanna's death Peter married Anna Barbara Meyer. Peter and Barbara were married on May 6, 1837. Anna Barbara Meyer was born January 1, 1806 in Stadtkyll and she was the daughter of Carl and Catherine (Shimbs) Meyer. (Mr. Peter Klaren, Village Historian, Müllenborn, Germany.) Peter and Barbara had several children. Their daughter and eldest child, Anna Katherina Clasen, was born and baptized August 19, 1849 in Roth. Godparents were John Meyer, single, of Roth and Anna Katherina (Hoffmann) Hap of Stadtkyll, wife of Heinrich Haepp.
     "Roth by Prüm" There are two Roths in Germany. One is between the cities of Nurnberg and Munich.  Roth (sometimes Röth) by Prűm is about a mile north of Műllenborn and is the home of St. Anthony's Catholic Parish. Many of the records referred to here are from this Parish. There is also a small chapel-church, St. Anthony of Padua built in the 1600s, in the center of Műllenborn. The chapel is open for prayer and the bells are still rung everyday at noon. Herr Josef Wirp and wife Gertrud were responsible for this ringing when it was rung manually.  My wife Mrs. Happ had the privilege of ringing these bells one noon  on the occasion of our visit to Germany in Nov of 1993.

                                                                                                              G.E. Happ


8. Heinrich (Heeb) HAEPP

Notes for Heinrich HAEPP 1805-1859:

    We first came in contact with these relatives on our second trip to Germany in 1995. They were excited to see us and we were very well received. It was common knowledge in the family one of their ancestors had immigrated to America many years ago. There had been some communication between the families in the early years. As a child Veronika (Haepp) Schmitz recalls seeing some letters in the house from  relatives in America. During the war all but the little church of Stadtkyll was leveled by the Allies and many records were lost. On  one such strike cousin Aloyius Haepp as just a boy was buried in rubble for ten hours.
    Heinrich Haepp was also a blacksmith and as a journeymen blacksmith he went from shop to shop as was the custom for tradesmen in Europe at the time. In his travels he found work in Stadtkyll with the Master Blacksmith Hoffmann. Here he married the blacksmith's daughter Anna Katherina Hoffmann.
   "These were years of poverty and poor times in this area and many could not find work. However Heinrich’s blacksmith shop was located along a postal route from Trier to Cologne and he tended the horses and stagecoaches that used the route so he was never without work" (Veronika Schmitz, Bonn, Germany).
   The Family has a written history of their branch of the family. Ursula Schmitz of Bonn, Germany was kind enough to send a copy for us to add to our records so the family is now a part of our Happ file.
   Heinrich's name on his French birth certificate is Heeb,  But today the family only knows Haepp. Family tradition has it that the "e" following the "a" in Haepp comes from the French influence. Since the French and English languages, do not use the umlaut the pronunciation of an ä is accomplished by adding the "e". This explanation does seem plausible because as we know from the history of the region it was French at various times. Immigrant Johann Happ's children's spelling of their last  name varies on their certificates yet he signed all documents as Johann HÄPP (umlaut A.)

                                                                                                        Gerard Happ


Anna Katherina HOFFMANN

Notes for Anna Katherina HOFFMANN 1809-1859:
    Anna’s  parents were Johann Josef Hoffmann and Maria Katherina Tielen both from Stadtkyll.
We have records for seven children from the Heinrich HAEPP / HOFFMANN marriage:
             Matthias HAEPP .............. 1835-1872              
              Johann Josef HAEPP ....... 1836-1902        All the Childrens dates are taken from a
              Anna Maria HAEPP........... 1838- .....         HAEPP Family Tree.
             Johann Peter HAEPP ....... 1840-1892
             Johann HAEPP ............... 1843-1919
             Anna HAEPP .................. 1846-......
             Katherina HAEPP ............ 1850-......
             Maria A. HAEPP .............. 1851-.......


26. Matthias HAEPP

Notes for Matthias HAEPP 1835-1872:
    “The oldest of the seven children, Matthias Haepp, suffered fatal injuries following a fall backwards down some steps (staircase).” as translated from the German “Familienchronk der Familie Haepp” or  “Family-Record of the Haepp Family” by Yvonne  (van  Tongeren)  Haepp of Stadtkyll, Germany.
    Cousin Veronika (Haepp) Schmitz of Bonn, Germany also writes:  “Father Heinrich [Haepp] and his wife [Anna] Katherina died in short succession in 1859 and left seven children unprovided for, four boys and three girls. The youngest was seven years old. The oldest son Matthias and his sister Anna - who was the oldest girl but only thirteen years of age - took care of their brothers and sisters and managed the Smithy business supported only by one experienced journeyman. All brothers including my Grandfather learned the profession of Blacksmith.”

Matthias, Matthias, Matthias        No  name, other than John, Joseph, and Peter which are often dropped, is found in the family list of first names.  We do not have to look very far for the reason.  In the proximity of Müllenborn and Stadtkyll is the historic city of Trier. Trier is the home of  St. Matthias Abby and Church. St. Matthias  is the Apostle chosen by lot to replace Judas Iscariot.  Tradition has it , Helen, the mother of Constantine  I , brought back the bones of the Apostle from her visit to Jerusalem in the year 326. The tomb and shrine has been the destination of  Pilgrimages for years. Legend has it  Matthias was beheaded  and thus he is depicted  in modern art with an axe. The book in his hands signifies his preaching of the Gospel.

G.E. Happ


28. Anna MARIA Haepp

Notes or Anna Maria HAEPP  1838-..... :

  Anna Maria born in Schoenfeld